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Saturday, June 29, 2013

Philippines in the 2013 Rugby Sevens World Cup

For the first time ever, the Philippine Volcanoes Rugby Sevens Team will compete in the most prestigious rugby sevens tournament in the world, the 2013 IRB Sevens World Cup. The Philippines qualified after defeating South Korea for the bronze medal in last year's HSBC Asian Rugby Sevens Series in Singapore.

The team will face one of the fastest developing rugby sevens teams in the world, Kenya in their first outing followed by one of the tournament contenders Samoa and finally Zimbabwe the next day.

I expected the team will get massacres in the first two games and a decent performance against Zimbabwe. However, this is rugby sevens where anything could happen . . .  where sometimes underdogs always win.

Anyway, as a young rugby nation, qualifying and playing in two of rugby sevens' premier events (Hong Kong Sevens and Rugby Seven World Cup) for the last two years are great achievements and we should be proud of them.



Pool C (Group Stage):

June 28 – Philippines 5 - 45 Kenya (as expected Kenya won this game with a big margin but I'm glad our boys manage to score a try through Gareth Holgate) [match details]
June 29 – Philippines 0 - 29 Samoa (as expected Samoa won this game but I thought the margin could've been bigger... I presume they're resting their top players for the bigger games in the next rounds) [match details]
June 29 – Philippines 7 - 19 Zimbabwe (unlike the previous two opponents, I actually underestimated Zimbabwe but at least the boys scored a converted try through Oliver Saunders) [match details]

Bowl Quarterfinals:
June 30 – Philippines 0 - 50 Japan (Philippines suffered its second try-less defeat in the Rugby Sevens World Cup to Asian powerhouse Japan) [match details]



Volcanoes Sevens (Philippines) trained with the eventual world champions All Blacks Sevens (New Zealand) in Moscow, Russia. [Source]

Roster:
  1. Andrew Wolff
  2. Ryan Eugene Clarke
  3. Oliver Saunders
  4. Gareth Holgate
  5. Jake Letts
  6. Joseph Matthews
  7. Justin Coveney
  8. Kenny Stern
  9. Matthew Saunders
  10. Michael Letts
  11. Sean Lynch
  12. Patrice Olivier

Matthew Saunders tries to slip between two Kenyan defenders on the day the Philippines created a piece of history by playing at Rugby World Cup Sevens 2013 in Moscow. Photo: IRB/Martin Seras Lima


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News Articles:

http://www.rwcsevens.com/index.html

[P.S. I DO NOT OWN ALL THE PHOTOS POSTED ON THIS ARTICLE]


Thursday, June 27, 2013

Basketball Rivalry: Philippines and Taiwan (Chinese Taipei)

This was an old post of mine I posted a couple of years ago (2011 FIBA Asia Championship) about the rivalry of two of the oldest national basketball teams in Asia. The Philippines-Taiwan basketball rivalry goes back to as early as the 1950s and the Philippines played against them more than 20 times in several tournaments and friendlies.

Taiwan was the first Asian team to upset the Philippines in the post-war period, and they ended the country's 37 years (1921-1958) unbeaten streaks in Asia during the 1958 Asian Games. In 1999 William Jones Cup tournament, the game between Taiwan and the Philippines prematurely ended with the biggest brawl in the tournament's history since the Taiwan-South Korea brawl in 1987. The Philippines withdrew from the tournament and failed to defend the title won by the Philippine Centennial Team in 1998. Almost ten years after the brawl, the Philippines' entry (Harbour Centre-sponsored Philippine national team) for the 2008 William Jones Cup was denied by the organizers believing that an all-pro, Philippine Basketball Association (PBA)-backed national team will generate more money and attract more Filipino crowds in Taiwan. In response, the Philippines did not send any delegation in that year's tournament. In 2011 FIBA Asia Championship, Taiwanese players were quoted that they were not happy with the cheap shots committed by their opponents, referring to the injury sustained by their teammate Lee Hseuh-lin after he was hit by the Philippines' JV Casio.

Anyway, the recent political tension between the Philippines and Taiwan made me want to revive this old post.

On May 10, 2013, after several warning shots were ignored near Balintang Island in the northern Philippines, the Philippine Coast Guard shot the Taiwanese fishing vessel, Guan Ta Hsin 28 killing fisherman Hung Shih-chen in the process. Hung's death sparked political tensions between the two neighboring countries. Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou used the incident to score popularity points and distract Taiwanese citizens from his domestic failures. He imposed a series of retaliatory measures against the Philippines, which include suspending the hiring of Filipino workers, issuing a red travel alert for the Philippines and halted bilateral economic exchanges . . .  Unless the Philippines issue a formal apology.

The Philippines, on the other hand, particularly the ignorant masses went to their usual racist rants in the internet thinking we got enough firepower to compete with a country who is virtually arming itself for more than 50 years to preserve its sovereignty from its bigger neighbor up north. The sad thing about this crisis was the situations of the Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs)  in Taiwan, who got nothing to do with the incident in the first place. They face the brunt of both sides, racist attacks by Taiwanese youths while Filipino idiots labeling them OFWs as "unpatriotic" for staying or working in Taiwan. This political crisis got even worse when Filipino President Noynoy Aquino refuses (or too lazy) to issue a formal apology himself and instead the idiotic Porsche driver near the Pasig River chooses to appoint someone to do the "apology." It reminds me of what the idiot did when the Chinese tourists from Hong Kong were massacred near the statue of Rizal three years ago.

The Philippine Coast Guard should've just intercepted and detained the fishing vessel in the first place, arrested the crew members, and hold them in custody instead of being trigger-happy just because the warning shots were ignored.

The political tensions, of course, prevented the Philippines national basketball team, Gilas Pilipinas, from defending its William Jones Cup title after the invitation issued before the crisis was withdrawn by the organizers. In other words, we got "uninvited."

Anyway, the Philippines and Taiwan were set to meet in a Group A match of the 2013 FIBA Asia Championship on August 3 in Manila (Mall of Asia Arena). That game was one of the most anticipated games and turn out to be one of the best games played by both teams in the tournament with Taiwan beating the Philippines, 84-79. The Philippines went on to top their second round group and marched to the finals of the Asian Championships beating Kazakhstan and another old-time rival South Korea along the way. Taiwan, on the other hand, upset Asian powerhouse China in the quarterfinals but was eliminated by eventual Asian champion Iran.

Below are the results between the Philippines and Taiwan in the Asian Games, the Asian Championships, and the William Jones Cup. Records between the Philippines and Taiwan in other major and minor tournaments, exhibition games, and friendlies are excluded for the time being and it will be add later to the list below.

Philippines and Taiwan

Asian Games (Philippines vs. Taiwan):
1954: PHILIPPINES 34 - 27 Taiwan
1958: TAIWAN 98 - 88 Philippines
1966: TAIWAN 74 - 72 Philippines
1970: TAIWAN 75 - 64 Philippines
2002: PHILIPPINES 83 - 69 Taiwan
2010: PHILIPPINES 82 - 73 Taiwan


FIBA Asia Championship/Asian Basketball Confederation (Philippines vs. Taiwan):
1960: PHILIPPINES 96 - 83 Taiwan / PHILIPPINES 99 - 78 Taiwan
1963: PHILIPPINES 70 - 65 Taiwan / TAIWAN 96 - 81 Philippines / PHILIPPINES 91 - 77 Taiwan
1965: PHILIPPINES 92 - 80 Taiwan
1967: PHILIPPINES 83 - 79 Taiwan
1969: PHILIPPINES 97 - 78 Taiwan
1971: PHILIPPINES 77 - 75 Taiwan
1973: PHILIPPINES 88 - 81 Taiwan / PHILIPPINES 101 - 64 Taiwan
1989: TAIWAN 97 - 74 Philippines
2009: PHILIPPINES 77 - 70 Taiwan
2011: PHILIPPINES 95 - 78 Taiwan [highlights]
2013: TAIWAN 84 - 79 Philippines (August 03, 2013, Mall of Asia Arena, Pasay City, Philippines)


Williams Jones Cup (Philippines vs. Taiwan)*:
1981: PHILIPPINES 74 - 44 Taiwan
1985: PHILIPPINES 80 - 66 Taiwan
1998: PHILIPPINES** 82 - 72 Taiwan [video 1/video 2]
1999: TAIWAN 66 - 42 Philippines (Game Stopped due to basketball brawl) [video] / Philippines vs. Taiwan B (Game was cancelled)
2000: TAIWAN 102 - 85 Philippines / TAIWAN 83 - 73 Philippines
2001: TAIWAN 84 - 79 Philippines
2002: TAIWAN 79 - 70 Philippines
2004: TAIWAN (White) 114 - 83 Philippines / TAIWAN (Blue) 88 - 68 Philippines
2005: TAIWAN 82 - 76 Philippines
2006: TAIWAN 77 - 72 Philippines (B)
2007: PHILIPPINES 82 - 64 Taiwan [highlights]
2009: TAIWAN 86 - 77 Philippines / PHILIPPINES 94 - 90 Taiwan (B)
2010: PHILIPPINES 96 - 93 Taiwan
2011: PHILIPPINES 90 - 78 Taiwan [highlights] / PHILIPPINES 82 - 72 Taiwan
2012: PHILIPPINES 99 - 68 Taiwan B (Guanghua/Kwang-Hwa) / PHILIPPINES 76 - 72 Taiwan A (Zhonghua)

[*] Prior to the 1998 William Jones Cup edition, I've only known that the Philippines competed in the 1981, 1984, 1985, 1987 editions and I'm still researching the match results between Taiwan and the Philippines from 1977 to 1997.
[**] The PBA-backed Philippine Centennial Team.


Other Tournaments (FIBA World Championships, Olympic Games, friendlies):
  • Taiwan 38 - 48 PHILIPPINES (1954 FIBA World Championship, October 29, 1954, Ginásio do Maracanãzinho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
  • PHILIPPINES 95 - 71 Taiwan (1964 Intercontinental Pre-Olympic Tournament, September 27, 1964, Yokohama, Japan)
  • Taiwan 59 - 95 PHILIPPINES (2002 Chinese Taipei Tour of the Philippines, August 21, 2002, Araneta Coliseum, Quezon City, Philippines)
  • Taiwan 56 - 82 PHILIPPINES (2002 Chinese Taipei Tour of the Philippines, August 22, 2002, Ynares Center, Antipolo City, Philippines)
  • TAIWAN 66 - 65 Philippines (2003 Chinese Taipei Tour of the Philippines, August 11, 2003, Philippines)
  • PHILIPPINES 75 - 68 Taiwan (2012 FIBA Asia Cup, quarterfinals, September 20, 2012, Ota Gymnasium, Tokyo, Japan)


Sources:

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Sunday, June 23, 2013

Philippine National Rugby Union Team Records in Official Tournaments (Updated as of 23 June 2013)

Philippine Volcanoes
This entry is about the Philippine National Rugby Union Team (nickname, Philippine Volcanoes).

The national team's steady advance to the upper divisions of Asian rugby and its performances in the Asian Five Nations tournaments made the Philippines as one of the rising rugby nations in Asia.

Official Name: Philippine National Rugby Union Team
Nickname: Volcanoes
Rugby Union: Philippine Rugby Football Union (PRFU)
Regional Federation: Asian Rugby Football Union (ARFU)
Current IRB World Ranking: 57 (as of June 17, 2013)

International Test Match Debut: Philippines 18 - Guam 14 (20 May 2006)
Biggest Victory: Philippines 101 - 0 Brunei , 2008 ARFU Five Nations Regional Tournament (02 July 2008)
Worst Defeat: Philippines 0 - 121 Japan, 2013 Asian Five Nations Premier Division (20 April 2013)


The following are the Volcanoes XV's records and finishes in official tournaments. 

2008 Asian Rugby Football Union (ARFU) Five Nations Regional Tournament (Pacific-Asia)
  • Philippines 101 vs. 0 Brunei (02 July 2008)
  • Philippines 20 vs. 8 Guam (05 July 2008)
Result: Champions
Win-loss record: 2 wins


2010 A5N DII Champions
2009 ARFU Five Nations Division 3 Tournament
  • Philippines 15 vs. 0 Iran (01 July 2009)
  • Philippines 25 vs. 0 Guam (04 July 2009)
Result: Champions (advance to the Asian Five Nations Division 2)
Win-loss record: 2 wins


2010 ARFU Five Nations Division 2 Tournament
  • Philippines 53 vs. 33 Thailand (02 June 2010)
  • Philippines 34 vs. 12 India (05 June 2010)
Result: Champions (advance to the Asian Five Nations Division I)
Win-loss record: 2 wins


2011 Asian Five Nations Division I Tournament
  • Philippines 20 - 34 South Korea (June 1), at Ansan Wa~ Stadium [Ansan, South Korea] (semi-final match) L [highlights]
  • Philippines 86 - 20 Malaysia  (June 4) , at Ansan Wa~ Stadium [Ansan, South Korea] (relegation match) W [highlights]
Result: 3rd place
Win-loss record: 1 win, 1 loss


2012 Asian Five Nations Division I Tournament
  • Philippines 37 - 20 Singapore (April 15), at Rizal Memorial Stadium [Manila, Philippines]
  • Philippines 34 - 12 Chinese Taipei (April 18), at Rizal Memorial Stadium [Manila, Philippines]
  • Philippines 28 - 18 Sri Lanka (April 21), at Rizal Memorial Stadium [Manila, Philippines]
Result: Champions (advance to the Asian Five Nations Premier Division)
Win-loss record: 3 wins


2013 Asian Five Nations Premier Division
  • Philippines 0 - 121 Japan (April 20), at Level 5 Stadium [Fukuoka, Japan]
  • Philippines 20 - 59 Hong Kong (May 4), at Rizal Memorial Stadium [Manila, Philippines]
  • Philippines 19 - 62 South Korea (May 11), at Seoul World Cup Stadium [Seoul, South Korea]
  • Philippines 24 - 8 United Arab Emirates (May 18), at Rizal Memorial Stadium [Manila, Philippines]
Result: 4th place
Win-loss record: 1 win, 3 losses


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Philippine National Football Team Records in Official Football Tournaments

Philippine Azkals
This entry is about the Philippine National Football Team (nickname, Philippine Azkals).

The Philippine National Football Team was the oldest national team in Asia and unfortunately, one of the region’s under-performing national teams.

After the Second World War and the rise of basketball commercialism in the Philippines, football could not match the popularity of the American sports the way it used to in the pre-war period.

However, in recent years, Philippine football was on a steady rise and its not that far from becoming the fastest developing football nation in the world. This revival of the beautiful game in the country also served as a catalyst for Filipino sports fans to finally realize that we are more than just a basketball nation. I just hope that prejudiced and biased fans would stop from childish and ignorant debate on which sport are better. Whether if its the Azkals (football), Gilas (basketball), the Volcanoes (rugby union), the Blu Boys (softball), or the Tamaraws (rugby league). . . it doesn't matter. . . they all carried the same official name (Philippines), they all carried the same flag and represented the same country.

Anyway, here are the Philippine Azkals record. . .  

Updated as of 28 November 2013

Official Name: Philippine National Football Team
Nicknames: Azkals, Philippine XI, Philippine Tri-Stars
Association: Philippine Football Federation (PFF)
Confederation: Asian Football Confederation (AFC)
Sub-Regional Confederation: ASEAN Football Federation (AFF)
Home Stadium: Rizal Memorial Stadium
Current FIFA World ranking: 133 (19th in AFC and 1st in AFF)
Highest FIFA Word ranking: 133 (November 2013)
Lowest FIFA World ranking: 195 (September 2006)
Current Elo ranking: 147
Highest Elo ranking: 26 (February 1913 – May 1915)
Lowest Elo ranking: 216 (December 2004)


Here is the Philippine national team’s record in official football tournaments.

Far Eastern Games
1913: 1st (champions) [vs. China, 2-1]
1915: 2nd (runner-up) [vs. China, 0-1; vs. China, 0-0; vs. China, 1-1]
1917: 2nd (runner-up) [vs. Japan, 15-2; vs. China, 0-3*]
1919: 2nd (runner-up) [vs. China, 0-2; vs. China, 2-1; vs. China, 1-2)]
1921: 2nd (runner-up) [vs. China, 0-1; vs. Japan, 3-0]
1923: 2nd (runner-up) [vs. China, 0-3; vs. Japan, 2-1]
1925: 2nd (runner-up) [vs. China, 1-5; vs. Japan, 4-0]
1927: 3rd place [vs. China, 1-3; vs. Japan, 1-2]
1930: 3rd place [vs. China, 0-5; vs. Japan, 2-7]
1934: 2nd (runner-up shared) [vs. China, 0-2; vs. Dutch East Indies, 3-2; vs. Japan, 3-4]

Win-loss record: 7 wins, 2 draws, 13 losses
[*] match apparently abandoned after China converted a controversially awarded penalty

Asian Games
1951: Did Not Participate
1954: Group Stage [vs. Vietnam, 2-3; vs. Taiwan, 0-4]
1958: Quarterfinals [vs. Hong Kong, 1-4; vs. Japan, 1-0; vs. Indonesia, 2-5 (quarter-final)]
1962: Group Stage [vs. Malaya, 1-15; vs. Indonesia, 0-6; vs. South Vietnam, 0-6]
1966-1970: Did Not Participate
1974: Group Stage [vs. Japan, 0-4; vs. Malaysia, 0-11; vs. Israel, 0-6]
1978-1998*: Did Not Participate
Win-loss record: 1 win, 0 draw, 10 losses
[*] The 1998 Asian Games Football tournament was the last tourney for senior men’s national football teams. From 2002, the  Asian Games Football Tournaments are an Under-23 tournament.

Asian Nations Cup
1956: Did Not Qualify [vs. South Korea, 0-2*; vs. South Korea 0-3*]
1960: Did Not Qualify [vs. Hong Kong, 0-7*; vs. Taiwan, 4-7*]
1964: Did Not Participate
1968: Did Not Qualify [vs. Taiwan, 0-9*; vs. Japan, 0-2*; vs. South Korea, 0-7*; vs. Indonesia, 0-6*]
1972-1976: Did Not Participate
1980: Did Not Qualify [vs. China, 0-3*; vs. South Korea, 0-5*; vs. Macao, 1-2*]
1984: Did Not Qualify [vs. Syria, 0-2*; vs. Thailand, 0-3*; vs. Indonesia, 0-1*; vs. Bangladesh, 2-3*; vs. Iran, 1-7*]
1988-1992: Did Not Participate
1996: Did Not Qualify [vs. Hong Kong, 0-8*; vs. China, 0-7*; vs. Macao, 1-5*]
2000: Did Not Qualify [vs. China, 0-8*; vs. Vietnam, 0-3*; vs. Guam, 2-0*]
2004: Did Not Participate
2007: Did Not Participate
2011: Did Not Qualify 

Win-loss record: 1 win, 0 draw, 21 losses
[*] Qualifying Games

Asian Challenge Cup
2006: Group Stage [vs. Taiwan, 0-1; vs. India, 1-1; vs. Afghanistan 1-1]
2008: Did Not Qualify [vs. Brunei, 1-0*; vs. Tajikistan, 0-0*; vs. Bhutan 3-0*]
2010: Did Not Qualify [vs. Bhutan, 1-0*; vs. Maldives, 2-3*; vs. Turkmenistan, 0-5*]
2012: 3rd place (bronze) [vs. Mongolia, 2-0*; vs. vs. Mongolia, 1-2*; vs. Myanmar, 1-1*; vs. Palestine, 0-0*; vs. Bangladesh, 3-0*; vs. North Korea, 0-2; vs. India, 2-0; vs. Tajikistan, 2-1; vs. Turkmenistan, 1-2; vs. Palestine, 4-3]
2014: Qualified [vs. Brunie, cancelled*; vs. Cambodia, 8-0*; vs. Turkmenistan, 1-0*]

Win-loss record: 10 wins, 5 draws, 6 losses
[*] Qualifying Games

Southeast Asian Games
1959-1975: Did Not Participate*
1977: Group Stage [vs. Brunei 1-4; vs. Malaysia, 0-5; vs. Indonesia, 1-1]
1979: Did Not Participate
1981: Group Stage [vs. Singapore, 0-4; vs. Indonesia, 0-2]
1983: Group Stage [vs. Malaysia, 0-0; vs. Singapore, 0-5]
1985: Group Stage [vs. Malaysia, 0-6; vs. Thailand, 0-7]
1987: Did Not Participate
1989: Group Stage [vs. Malaysia, 0-3; vs. Indonesia, 1-5; vs. Brunei, 0-2]
1991: 4th place (semi-finalists) [vs. Vietnam, 2-2; vs. Malaysia, 1-0; vs. Indonesia, 1-2; vs. Thailand, 2-6 (semi-final); vs. Singapore, 0-2 (bronze medal match)]
1993: Group Stage [vs. Singapore, 0-7; vs. Vietnam, 0-1; vs. Indonesia, 1-3]
1995: Group Stage [vs. Myanmar, 1-4; vs. Laos, 0-1; vs. Singapore, 0-4; vs. Brunei, 1-0]
1997: Group Stage [vs. Malaysia, 0-4; vs. Laos, 1-4; vs. Indonesia, 0-2; vs. Vietnam, 0-3]
1999: Group Stage [vs. Thailand, 0-9; vs. Myanmar, 1-4; vs. Laos, 2-3; vs. Vietnam, 0-2]**

Win-loss record: 2 wins, 3 draws, 28 losses
[*] From 1959-1975, the event was called the Southeast Asian Peninsular Games with only mainland SEA states involved. The archipelago states of the Philippines and Indonesia did not participate.
[**] The 1999 SEA Games Football tournament was the last tourney for senior men’s national football teams. From 2001, the  SEA Games Football Tournaments are an Under-23 tournament.

ASEAN Tiger Cup
1996: Group Stage [vs. Thailand, 0-5; vs. Malaysia, 0-7; vs. Singapore, 0-3; vs. Brunei, 0-1]
1998: Group Stage [vs. Singapore, 0-1*; vs. Cambodia, 1-1*; vs. Indonesia, 0-3; vs. Thailand, 1-3; vs. Myanmar, 2-5]
2000: Group Stage [vs. Indonesia, 0-3; vs. Myanmar, 0-3; vs. Thailand, 0-2]
2002: Group Stage [vs. Myanmar, 1-6; vs. Vietnam, 1-4; vs. Cambodia, 0-1; vs. Indonesia, 1-13]
2004: Group Stage [vs. Myanmar, 0-1; vs. Malaysia, 1-4; vs. East Timor, 2-1; vs. Thailand, 1-3]

Win-loss record: 1 win, 1 draw, 18 losses
[*] Qualifying Games

ASEAN Football Federation (AFF Suzuki Cup)
2007: Group Stage [vs. Laos, 1-2*; vs. East Timor, 7-0*; vs. Cambodia, 1-0*; vs. Brunei, 4-1*; vs. Malaysia, 0-4; vs. Thailand, 0-4; vs. Myanmar, 0-0]
2008: Did Not Qualify [vs. East Timor, 1-0*; vs. Brunei, 1-1*; vs. Laos, 1-2*; vs. Cambodia, 3-2*]
2010: 4th place (Semi-finals) [vs. East Timor, 5-0*; vs. Laos, 2-2*; vs. Cambodia, 0-0*; vs. Singapore, 1-1; vs. Vietnam, 2-0; vs. Myanmar, 0-0; vs. Indonesia, 0-1 (semi-final); vs. Indonesia, 0-1 (semi-final)] - Philippines in the 2010 AFF Suzuki Cup
2012: 3rd place (Semi-finals) [vs. Thailand, 1-2; vs. Vietnam, 1-0; vs. Myanmar, 2-0; vs. Singapore, 0-0; vs. Singapore, 0-1]

Win-loss record: 9 wins, 7 draws, 7 losses
[*] Qualifying Games

FIFA World Cup
1930-1938: Did Not Participate
1950: Withdrew
1954-1962: Did Not Participate
1966: Suspended by FIFA
1970: Did Not Participate
1974: Withdrew
1978-1994: Did Not Participate
1998: Did Not Qualify [vs. India, 0-2*; vs. Qatar, 0-5*; Sri Lanka, 0-3*]
2002: Did Not Qualify [vs. Syria, 0-12*; vs. Syria, 1-5*; vs. Oman, 0-7*; vs. Oman, vs. 0-2*; vs. Laos, 0-2*; vs. Laos, 1-1*]
2006-2010: Did Not Participate
2014: Did Not Qualify [vs. Sri Lanka, 1-1*; vs. Sri Lanka, 4-0*; vs. Kuwait, 0-3*; vs. Kuwait, 1-2*]
Win-loss record: 1 win, 2 draws, 10 losses
[*] Qualifying Games

Olympic Games
1908-1964: Did Not Participate
1968: Did Not Qualify [vs. Japan, 0-15*; vs. Lebanon, 1-11*; vs. Taiwan, 2-7*; vs. South Vietnam, 0-10*; vs. South Korea, 0-5*]
1972: Did Not Qualify [vs. Taiwan, 3-0*; vs. South Korea, 0-6*; vs. Japan, 1-8*; vs. Malaysia, 0-5*]
1976: Did Not Qualify [vs. Japan, 0-3*; vs. Japan, 0-3*]
1980: Did Not Qualify [vs. Indonesia, 0-4*; vs. Japan, 0-10*; vs. Brunei, 0-2*; South Korea, 0-8*; vs. Malaysia, 0-8*]
1984: Did Not Qualify [vs. Japan, 0-7*; vs. Japan 1-10*]
1988: Did Not Qualify [vs. Hong Kong, 0-5*; vs. China, 0-9*; vs. China, 0-10*; vs. Hong Kong, 0-7*]**

Win-loss record: 1 win, 0 draw, 21 losses
[*] Qualifying Games
[**] The 1988 Olympic Games Football tournament was the last tourney for senior men’s national football teams. From 1992, the Olympic Games Football Tournaments are an Under-23 tournament.

Other Tournaments:
  • 2010 Long Teng Cup, 3rd place
  • 2011 Long Teng Cup, 2nd place
  • 2012 Philippine Peace Cup, 1st place
  • 2013 Philippine Peace Cup, 1st place


Notable Players:
  • Paulino Alcántara
    Paulino Alcántara - F.C. Barcelona football legend, 2007 PFF Centennial Award for the Most Outstanding Player of the Pre-War Era [he lead the Philippines to silver medal finished in the 1917 Far Eastern Games, including the 15-2 thrashing of Japan]
  • Eddie Pacheco - Philippine basketball and football legend, 2007 PFF Centennial Award for the Most Outstanding Player of the Post-War Era
  • Norman Fegidero - former Philippine national team captain, he lead the Philippines to its best finished ever in Southeast Asian Games (4th place in the 1991 SEA Games). He capped almost 70 international matches for the Philippines before retiring from national team duty in 2001.
  • Alfredo Razon Gonzales - former Philippine national team captain
  • Christopher Greatwich - he lead the Philippines (by scoring two goals) to its best finished ever in the ASEAN Football Federation Cup (4th place in the 2010 AFF Suzuki Cup)
  • Phil Younghusband - the most prolific scorer of the current active Philippine internationals. He was the leading goalscorer and recipient of the Golden Shoe award in the 2012 Asian Challenge Cup where he lead the Philippines to a third place finished.
  • Neil Etheridge - the incumbent Philippine national team goalkeeper [played a vital role in Azkals' impressive performance in the 2010 AFF Suzuki Cup]


National Team Head Coaches:
    Dionisio Calvo
  • Dionisio Calvo [Philippines] (1934)
  • Alan Rogers [England] (1962–1963)
  • Danny McLennan [Scotland] (1963)
  • Florentino Broce [Philippines] (1973–1974)
  • Carlos Cavagnaro [Argentina] (1989)
  • Eckhard Krautzun [Germany] (1991-1992)
  • Noel Casilao [Philippines] (1993–1996)
  • Juan Cutillas [Spain] (1996–2000)
  • Rodolfo Alicante [Philippines] (2000)
  • Masataka Imai [Japan] (2001)
  • Sugao Kambe [Japan] (2002–2003)
  • Jose Ariston Caslib [Philippines] (2004–2007)
  • Norman Fegidero Jr. [Philippines] (2008)
  • Juan Cutillas [Spain] (2008–2009)
  • Jose Ariston Caslib [Philippines] (2009)
  • Des Bulpin [England] (2009–2010)
  • Simon McMenemy [England] (2010)
  • Hans Michael Weiss [Germany] (2011-2014)
  • Thomas Dooley [USA] (2014-present)

Facts:
  • Biggest Victory: Philippines 15 vs. Japan 2, 1917 Far Eastern Games (Paulino Alcántara played in this game)
  • Biggest Defeat: Philippines 0 vs. Japan 15, 1967 Olympic Qualifier
  • Dionisio Calvo represented the Philippines as a swimmer (1921-1925 Far Eastern Games) and as a basketball player (1925 Far Eastern Games) in the pre-war period. He later became the only Filipino to coach both the Philippine national basketball team (1936 and 1948 Olympic Games, 1951 Asian Games) and the Philippine national football team (1934 Far Eastern Games) in history. Calvo was the founding father of the now-defunct Manila Industrial and Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) in 1938 and the founding Secretary-General of the Asian Basketball Confederation (later renamed FIBA Asia). He was the only Filipino named in the inaugural FIBA Hall of Fame in 2007.

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