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Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The Philippines in the FIBA Asia Championship

This post is one of the continuations of the blog post: Philippine National Team Records in Official Tournaments.

The most important international basketball tournament in Asia is the FIBA Asia Championship where the Philippines captured nine medals including five championship gold medals.

Coach Arturo Rius and captain Carlos Loyzaga in 1960
In 1960, the Carlos Loyzaga-led national team captured the first ever championship title in front of the home crowd in Manila with Carlos Badion winning the tournament’s Most Valuable Player award and joined by the Great Difference himself in the all-tournament mythical five selections. The Philippines defended the title in 1963 but loss the championship to Japan in 1965. The national team regained the Asian Championship in 1967 where Narciso Bernardo and Robert Jaworski were named in the mythical five selections at the end of the tournament. In 1969 and 1971, the Philippines finished third and second respectively

In 1973, the Philippines hosted the Asian Championship for the second time and also captured the gold medal for the fourth time in history. The national team finished fifth in 1975 and 1977, and fourth in 1979 and 1981. In 1983, the Philippines became the first unbeaten nation to finished outside the top eight of the Asian Championship after illegally fielding naturalized players in the group stage.

In 1985, the Philippines won its fifth Asian Championship title and it would be the last medal won by the Philippines in the 20th Century. The 1985 NCC squad was also the last national team to qualify in the World Championship but failed to participate in the tournament due to the shortcomings of the Basketball Association of the Philippines (BAP) [EDSA Revolution was the main reason why the NCC program discontinued but it’s not the main reason why we failed to participate in the World Championship. Think about it. The World Champs did not take place until about July 1986. EDSA took place in February. They got about five months to prepare but BAP did not do anything about it like they always do for the next 20 years]. In 1987, the Philippines finished 4th place in the tournament, the last semifinal appearance by an all-amateur squad with Alvin Patrimonio named in the tournament’s mythical five selections.

For the next 24 years, the Philippines had a very dismal record in the Asian Championship with 15th place as its worst finished ever in 2003. The Philippines was also suspended twice (2001 and 2005-2007) in that period. In 2007 and 2009, the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) decided to send an all-pro team to the FIBA Olympic and World qualifiers but only managed to finish 9th (unlucky draw) and 8th (lack of preparation) respectively.

In 2011, a semi-pro national team (Smart Gilas Pilipinas) reached the semis for the first time since 1987 and finished fourth in the competition. In 2013, the Philippines hosted the tournament for the third time in history with the all-pro Gilas Pilipinas national team reaching the finals for the first time since 1986 and captured just the third silver medal in the Asian Championship after losing to Asian powerhouse Iran. The silver medal finished and the classic semi-final victory over the Philippines' bogey team, South Korea, secured the country its first FIBA World Cup qualification since 1986 and its first appearance since the 1978 FIBA World Championship.

Here are the official record of the Philippine National Basketball Team in the Olympic and World Qualifier, the FIBA Asia Championship (formerly known as the Asian Basketball Confederation Championship or Asian Basketball Championship).

Appearances: 25 (1960, 1963, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013)
Medals: 9 medals (5 gold medals, 3 silver medals, 1 bronze medal)
Best Finished: Gold (1960, 1963, 1967, 1973, 1985), Silver (1965, 1971, 2013), Bronze (1969)
Win-Loss Record: 196 games (129 wins, 67 losses)

1960*: 1st place (gold) [vs. Indonesia, 92-46; vs. Hong Kong, 115-66; vs. Malaysia, 126-58; vs. South Korea, 97-79; vs. Japan, 97-73; vs. Taiwan, 96-83; vs. South Korea, 96-82; vs. Japan, 92-80; vs. Taiwan, 99-78]

1963: 1st place (gold) [vs. Thailand, 83-60; vs. South Vietnam, 124-61; vs. Malaysia, 103-42; vs. Singapore, 114-64; vs. Hong Kong, 92-69; vs. South Korea, 59-62; vs. Taiwan, 70-65; vs. Thailand, 91-53; vs. South Korea, 85-81; vs. Taiwan, 81-96; vs. vs. Taiwan, 91-77]

1965: 2nd place (silver) [vs. Malaysia, 82-53; vs. Singapore, 104-39; vs. South Vietnam, 88-50; vs. Japan 74-54; vs. South Korea, 59-50; vs. Malaysia, 90-72; vs. Japan, 65-71; vs. Thailand, 79-64; vs. Taiwan, 92-80]

1967: 1st place (gold) [vs. Indonesia, 103-67; vs. Malaysia, 92-55; vs. India, 111-63; vs. Japan, 81-69; vs. Singapore, 107-58; vs. Taiwan, 83-79; vs. Hong Kong, 103-52; vs. Thailand, 95-66; vs. South Korea, 83-80]

1969: 3rd place (bronze) [vs. India, 106-85; vs. Taiwan, 97-78; vs. Hong Kong, 113-73; vs. Japan, 77-78; vs. Thailand, 89-73; vs. Pakistan, 121-76; vs. Malaysia, 97-61; vs. South Korea, 86-95]

1971: 2nd place (silver) [vs. Singapore, 134-80; vs. vs. Hong Kong, 133-57; vs. Malaysia, 95-53; vs. Thailand, 121-72; vs. South Korea, 88-80; vs. Japan, 69-93; vs. India, 91-62; vs. Taiwan, 77-75]

1973*: 1st place (gold) [vs. Pakistan, 133-55; vs. India, 109-73; vs. Indonesia, 108-77; vs. Singapore, 130-49; vs. Taiwan, 88-81; vs. Iran, 88-80; vs. Japan, 89-68; vs. Taiwan, 101-64; vs. India, 110-84; vs. South Korea, 90-78]

1975: 5th place [vs. Singapore, 97-72; vs. Indonesia, 117-87; vs. China, 85-105; vs. Thailand, 96-88; vs. Pakistan, 105-86; vs. Hong Kong, 122-88; vs. Japan, 85-100; vs. India; 69-113; vs. South Korea, 74-121]

1977: 5th place [vs. Pakistan, 103-87; vs. Sri Lanka, 119-70; vs. Japan, 66-71; vs. Indonesia, 120-56; vs. China, 60-117; vs. South Korea, 82-96; vs. Japan, 71-83; vs. Malaysia, 84-88; vs. Iraq, 91-90]

1979: 4th place [vs. Singapore, 128-65; vs. South Korea, 107-118; vs. Thailand, 91-81; vs. Japan, 94-111; vs. China, 89-124; vs. India, 95-86; vs. Pakistan, 123-100]
Allan Caidic (8) guarding China's Wang Li Bin in 1985 ABC

1981: 4th place [vs. Thailand, 81-64; vs. Singapore, 92-47; vs. South Korea, 62-90; vs. China, 66-97; vs. Malaysia, 82-70; vs. Japan, 82-99; vs. India, 78-65]

1983: 9th place [vs. Kuwait, 78-57; vs. India, 90-60; vs. Malaysia, 85-80; vs. Indonesia, 95-64; vs. Thailand, 74-69]**

1985: 1st place (gold) [vs. Jordan 81-70; vs. Pakistan, 100-51; vs. Japan, 87-70; vs. South Korea, 76-72; vs. Malaysia, 75-65; vs. China, 82-72]

1987: 4th place [vs. Jordan, 97-91; vs. India, 87-79; vs. China, 94-97; vs. Malaysia, 97-94; vs. Thailand, 98-86; vs. South Korea, 88-105; vs. Japan, 75-89]

1989: 8th place [vs. Bangladesh, 150-52; vs. Hong Kong, 115-83; vs. Taiwan, 74-97; vs. China, 73-118; vs. Japan, 67-86; vs. Iran, 86-93; vs. Saudi Arabia, 89-91]

1991: 7th place [vs. China, 79-107; vs. Kuwait, 77-59; vs. Bahrain, 107-83; vs. Malaysia, 126-77; vs. Japan, 83-110; vs. South Korea, 83-96; vs. North Korea, 87-86; vs. Iran, 81-91; vs. Jordan, 2-0]

1993: 11th place [vs. United Arab Emirates, 70-74; vs. South Korea, 75-80; vs. Singapore, 89-62; vs. Hong Kong, 96-75; vs. Kuwait, 82-84; vs. Indonesia, 89-76]

1995: 12th place [vs. United Arabs Emirates, 56-70; vs. South Korea, 76-98; vs. Uzbekistan, 60-82; vs. Iran, 53-68; vs. India, 83-77; vs. Hong Kong, 69-65; vs. Kuwait, 63-70]

1997: 9th place [vs. Iran, 76-77; vs. China, 72-107; vs. Bahrain, 68-70; vs. Kazakhstan, 84-74; vs. India, 89-69; vs. Bahrain, 84-79]

1999: 11th place [vs. South Korea, 63-98; vs. United Arab Emirates, 81-95; vs. Lebanon, 50-60; vs. Uzbekistan, 64-94; vs. Thailand, 82-58; vs. Bahrain, 83-75]

2001: Did Not Participate (Suspended by FIBA)***

2003: 15th place [vs. Japan, 64-66; vs. Qatar, 69-77; vs. Jordan, 83-67; vs. Hong Kong, 58-66; vs. Kuwait, 66-79; vs. Syria, 77-95; vs. Malaysia, 78-63]

2005: Did Not Participate (Suspended by FIBA)****

2007: 9th place [vs. Iran, 69-75; vs. China, 79-64; vs. Jordan, 76-84; vs. Syria, 107-100; vs. India, 104-69; vs. Kuwait, 89-58; vs. China, 78-76]

2009: 8th place [vs. Sri Lanka, 115-31; vs. Japan, 78-69; vs. South Korea, 56-69; vs. Taiwan, 77-70; vs. Iran, 78-88; vs. Kuwait, 85-71; vs. Jordan, 70-81; vs. Qatar, 65-83; vs. South Korea, 80-82]

2011: 4th place [vs. United Arab Emirates, 92-52; vs. China, 60-75; vs. Bahrain, 113-71; vs. Jordan, 72-64; vs. Japan, 83-76; vs. Syria, 75-52; vs. Taiwan, 95-78; vs. Jordan, 61-75; vs. South Korea, 68-70]

2013*: 2nd place (silver) [vs. Saudi Arabia, 78-66; vs. Jordan, 77-71; vs. Taiwan, 79-84; vs. Japan, 90-71; vs. Qatar, 80-70; vs. Hong Kong, 67-55; vs. Kazakhstan, 88-58; vs. South Korea, 86-79; vs. Iran, 71-85]


[*] Host Nation.
[**] Philippines was penalized for fielding more than one naturalized players in the preliminary rounds and was relegated to the classification rounds instead. As a result, the Philippines became the only unbeaten national team never to win a medal in a single championship
[***] The First Leadership Crisis (2001)
[****] The Second Leadership Crisis (2005-2007)


****


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